Eye Tracking for Improving Nurse Training

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UCLA School of Nursing used SMI Eye Tracking Glasses to assess nurses in a series of clinical simulations.

Challenge

The challenge was to assess how novice and experienced nurses allocate their visual attention in a series of clinical simulations. Improving nursing training and removing subjectivity in the assessment of these trainees nurses is the long term goal. But also in the shorter term, novice nurses will benefit from knowing what they looked at in intense clinical situations.

Solution

Participants wore SMI Eye Tracking Glasses while carrying out a series of seven simulated nursing tasks in a monitored environment. These include placing a pulse oximeter on a finger, listening to lung sounds and applying an oxygen delivery device.

SMI Eye Tracking

SMI Eye Tracking Glasses are a unique tool which records a person’s natural gaze behavior while performing interactive tasks – making them the choice for real-life workplace studies.

Benefit

The lead researcher in this study, Assistant Professor-in-Residence Mary Ann Shinnick, found eye tracking glasses of great value in removing subjectivity from the assessment of nurses and believes it could be a useful tool in helping novice nurses gain situational awareness and refine their focus.

Background

Every year in U.S. hospitals, more than 400,000 patients die from preventable causes. Ensuring patient care at the highest level needs health care educators to train and certify safe, competent nurses. For decades, educators in nursing and medicine have used expert opinion to assess nurses which is subjective, and brings with it questions about interrater reliability and validity.

The UCLA School of Nursing looked to mobile eye tracking as a way of addressing this issue, by staging elaborate simulations involving both trainees and experienced nurses.

Benefit

The lead researcher in this study, Assistant Professor-in-Residence Mary Ann Shinnick, found eye tracking glasses of great value in removing subjectivity from the assessment of nurses and believes it could be a useful tool in helping novice nurses gain situational awareness and refine their focus.

Customer institution University of California, Los Angeles
Customer website www.ucla.edu