Eye Tracking and Self-Regulated Learning Strategies

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Researcher from University of Duisburg-Essen used SMI Eye Tracking Glasses and ASGM automated analysis to identify underlying processes of generative drawing as a self-regulated learning strategy.

Challenge

How do school-aged children deal with complex scientific texts and what are the cognitive and metacognitive processes that take place as they complete the tasks required of them? What they write, and in this case, what they draw, in response to set instructions only gives part of the answer. The challenge was to get deeper insights into the (meta-)cognitive processes involved based on where they direct their attention.

Solution

Fifty-two eighth and ninth grade (14-year-old) students from German schools were given seven paper sheets of A3 with text printed on the left hand side of each sheet. Twenty-six were asked to read the text and draw a picture for each of the seven parts of the text reflecting the main aspects of this part, while 26 students received author-generated pictures in addition to the text and thus served as the control group 0

SMI Eye Tracking

Given the printed matter involved, Eye Tracking Glasses were the perfect tools for measuring students’ attention. And given the fact that the study produced more than 20 hours of video from 52 participants, SMI’s ASGM – an automated analysis solution aimed at both academic and commercial users of SMI Eye Tracking Glasses (ETG) – was the right choice for analysis, saving time and producing quality data.

Benefit

Insights from the study provide a better understanding of the metacognitive processes involved during learning which can ultimately help teachers choose the methods and instructions offering the best learning outcomes.

Background

Johannes Hellenbrand, a Researcher at the Department of Instructional Psychology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany, studies the cognitive and metacognitive processes that occur during learning with self-generated pictures. With a background in educational psychology, his studies often involve participants viewing media in different forms such as print and still images – so he chooses to conduct his studies with SMI Eye Tracking Glasses. His latest study involved more than 50 participants and produced more than 20 hours of video for analysis – so he also turned to SMI’s automated gaze mapping (ASGM) to process the recordings.

Benefit

Insights from the study provide a better understanding of the metacognitive processes involved during learning which can ultimately help teachers choose the methods and instructions offering the best learning outcomes.