Eye Tracking and Bio Sensors

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Berkeley students were given the chance to integrate SMI Eye Tracking with other bio-sensing technologies during a workshop.

Challenge

What can smart and creative students come up with when they get their hands on some cutting-edge eye tracking technology?

In what ways can eye tracking be combined with other sensing modalities and wearable platforms to provide compelling new applications?

How easy or difficult is it to develop new applications using eye tracking in conjunction with other wearable technologies?

Solution

Students are introduced to eye tracking technologies, applications, and techniques with a SMI guest lecture and hands-on demo.

An equipment loan of remote and wearable eye trackers allows students to incorporate eye tracking into their projects.

SMI Eye Tracking

Within seven weeks, one student team was able to integrate the SMI remote eye tracker with Myo, a gesture-control armband based on the electromyogram, to manipulate virtual objects using a combination of eye gaze and arm/hand gestures.

Another project combined synchronized data from a head-mounted gyroscope and the SMI Eye Tracking Glasses to quantify the relationships between head motion and visual attention in different outdoor settings.

Benefit

Most students have not heard of eye tracking before. However, a quick tutorial and demo later, they were off and running with their innovative project ideas. It turns out that eye tracking actually lends itself naturally to integration with other wearable and bio-sensing technologies.

Background

An innovative course "Sensors, Humans, Data, Apps" was offered at the UC Berkeley School of Information in Fall 2015. The course brought together graduate students from across disciplines to design and prototype novel applications using a wide range of wearable and bio-sensing technologies.

Students had access to a device lending library that included ECG, EEG, EMG, GSR sensing devices, augmented reality glasses, virtual reality headsets, associated SDKs and APIs, and rapid prototyping systems.

The students are thus given a hands-on learning platform to articulate their personal visions on the future of wearable and bio-sensing technologies, by pursuing projects that leverage a novel combination of sensing modalities.

Benefit

Most students have not heard of eye tracking before. However, a quick tutorial and demo later, they were off and running with their innovative project ideas. It turns out that eye tracking actually lends itself naturally to integration with other wearable and bio-sensing technologies.

Customer institution University of Berkeley
Customer name Professor John Chuang
Customer website www.berkeley.edu