Eye Tracking for Developmental Psychology

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Understand how infants and young children express their interest for the world and interact with it.

Visual cognitive abilities in infancy

Visual cognitive abilities in infancy

Eye tracking helps study the development of cognitive abilities in infancy. With SMI Remote Eye Tracking researchers use traditional looking time measures, such as habituation and visual preference, to assess infants’ memory for and categorization of visual stimuli. Eye-tracking allows them to gain deeper insights into the underlying visuo-cognitive processes and how they are modulated by object properties, attentional guidance from parents and the child’s state of arousal.

Decision-making in complex natural settings

Decision-making in complex natural settings

Eye tracking data reveals individual patterns of visual behavior, reflecting implicit factors and phases of decision making. Through the unobtrusive desing of modern eye tracking glasses, researchers can conduct their studies in natural settings, thus enabling more ecologically valid research with infants and young children.

Social cognition research with young children

Social cognition research with young children

In social cognition research eye tracking is used to reveal how different language instructions affect young children's performance in tasks where they have to adopt a protagonist's perspective. For example, asking young children to anticipate a protagonist's actions by using an open question (e.g., 'Where will Lucy go now?') elicits different patterns of eye movements than focusing their attention on a certain target (e.g., 'Where will Lucy go to play with her doggie?') even though they may give the same answer to both questions.
Dr. Paula Rubio-Fernandez

SMI Experiment Suite Scientific software offers a very elegant solution for designing and analyzing Visual World and Preferential Looking experiments. With Proportion of Looks I can aggregate data over multiple stimuli and trials – which is very useful.

Dr. Paula Rubio-Fernandez

Dr. Paula Rubio-Fernandez,
Center for the Study of Mind in Nature, University of Oslo