Eye Tracking for Biomechanics

Background image
Gain insight into the relationship between visual input and motor responses.

Locomotion and gait analysis

Locomotion and gait analysis

Visual cues during locomotion help guide many aspects of gait such as initiation, obstacle negotiation, and termination. Assessments of the kinematic structure of human locomotion are often assessed by sports biomechanists to help athletes perform more efficiently and by motor rehabilitation researchers to understand the gait impairments that occur after nervous system damage. Eye tracking will help researchers learn how the nervous system integrates visual information to acquire new motor skills as well as how it relearns and compensates following CNS damage or with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease.

Balance and postural stability

Balance and postural stability

Visual input is a key regulator of our postural control system, especially during dynamic motor tasks. With the aid of eye tracking, sports scientists can assess gaze strategies during diverse motor activities such as throwing and kicking to improve performance. Basic and clinical biomechanics researchers can utilize eye tracking to assess the role vision plays in everyday motor tasks such as climbing stairs and lifting a cup of coffee, as well as how this complex visuomotor coordination is effected following nervous system damage, degeneration, and with aging.

Hand-eye coordination

Hand-eye coordination

Gaze plays a large role in motor planning and goal-directed movement execution, especially during reaching, grasping and fine digit manipulation. Eye tracking can serve as a training tool to assess hand-eye coordination in amateur and professional athletes as well as provide information on the visuomotor disruptions that can occur with aging and after neurological injury or disease.